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How To Repair A Lawn Patch

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No one wants bare spots on their lawn. They’re unsightly and may indicate more significant problems. Unfortunately, unless repaired, bare spots may continue to grow. Repairing a lawn patch is a simple job you can do yourself.

Repairing A Lawn Patch In 3 Simple Steps

  • Rake the damaged area and remove all dead grass and debris, leaving you with just dirt.
  • Apply 2 inches of topsoil to the area, and then spread grass seed on top of the soil.
  • Water the seed right away so it penetrates the soil and will not blow away. 

Once you have followed these three easy steps, you should continue watering for approximately 20 minutes every day. After 2 to 3 weeks, you will see little seedlings sprouting. You should try to refrain from mowing during this period, but try to avoid the newly seeded areas if you need to mow. After three weeks, you will have a good idea of how well the seeding has worked, and you are free to apply more grass to areas that are not coming in as thick. It is recommended that seeding be done in the spring or the fall because it will germinate better when temperatures are cooler and there is some natural moisture.

How To Repair A Lawn Patch

Sod As An Option

If you would prefer to resod, then reseed, this is also a great option that can be broken down into simple steps. 

  • Place the new sod over the bare spot.
  • Using a garden spade, cut the new sod in the exact shape of the bare spot.
  • Dig out the bare spot to a depth of 2-3 inches so that the new sod can be placed into the area and still be flush with the surrounding turf. 
  • Water 20 minutes per day for at least three weeks so that the new sod will root into the ground and take over. 

Questions?

For more information on how to repair a lawn patch, don’t hesitate to contact our Lawn Care Expert, Luis Perez, via email at luisp@doctorgreen.com.

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