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Grass Cutting: Mowing Illinois, Indiana & Texas Lawns

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Grass cutting is one of the most important aspects for maintaining a beautiful, healthy yard, as it helps increases turfgrass density, which produces a thicker lawn that is resistant to weeds.

Outlined below are a few best practices from our lawn care experts for those living in Illinois, Indiana, and Texas for cutting these types of grasses.

Grass Cutting: Illinois & Indiana

The most common types of grasses found in Illinois and Indiana include:

  • Kentucky Bluegrass
  • Fescue
  • Ryegrass

When cutting “northern” types of grasses we strongly recommend that you do not cut them too short. These grasses should but cut to approximately 2 ½ to 4 inches. However, in the heat of the summer, we strongly recommend that you stay on the higher end of the scale so that the soil and grassroots are shaded so they do not dry out in the extreme heat. With that said, it is also important not to let these types of grasses get too tall, as it can result in lower plant density and making them more susceptible to turf diseases.

Grass Cutting: Texas

The most common types of grasses found in Texas include:

  • Bermuda
  • Zoysia
  • St Augustine

When cutting “southern” types of grasses we strongly recommend that you do cut them shorter, however, the grass must grow taller before cutting. These types of grasses should but cut to approximately ½ an inch to 3½ inches. It is important to note that “southern” grasses tend to be less maintenance than “northern” grasses due to their stronger root base. However, it is important to establish a consistent and frequent mowing schedule to ensure the grass remains healthy.

Grass Cutting: In General

We suggest when grass cutting to leave clippings on the lawn. This will provide a protective barrier and help the grass retain moisture in the summer months. If your yard develops a fungus, we recommend that you pick up the clipping for 2 to 3 mowing cycles, which will give your lawn time to recover from the disease.

We encourage you to maintain a sharp lawnmower blade, as a dull mower blade will rip and tear at the grass weakening it and making it susceptible to insects and diseases.

It is also important, when you’re grass cutting, that you do not cut off more than a third of the grass blade in one cut. As you may not measure your grass with a ruler, a “rule of thumb” is to never go more than a week in between cuts. If you cut off more than a third of the grass blade at one time you are likely going to cut off the grass’s nutrient supply, which would result in a dry, patchy yard.

Finally, we also suggest that you make sure your grass is healthy before cutting it, as you do not want to spread diseases throughout your yard.

Did you know? 

One useful tip for better weed control that most people don’t know is to cut your lawn 4-7 days after a weed control treatment. This allows enough time for weed killers to penetrate the weeds but also speeds up their control.


Quick Guide to Mowing Your Lawn Correctly

  1. Keep lawnmower blades sharp by sharpening them at least once a year. This will help the health of your lawn and decrease disease.
  2. Stay on the higher side when grass cutting if you are uncertain about how much to take off, as this will help keep the grassroots healthy and strong.
  3. When grass cutting leave clippings on the lawn, as this will help ensure you have a nice barrier, helping your grass retain moisture and nutrients.
  4. Never go more than a week in between cuts, as you do not want to cut off more than a third of the blade in one cut. Recommend cutting your lawn 4-7 days after a weed treatment to help maintain a lush, green yard.

Want to learn more or do you have questions?

For more information on grass cutting, please contact our Lawn Care Expert, Luis Perez, via email at luisp@doctorgreen.com.

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